Monthly Archives: August 2016

How Interact With Ecommerce

2016 has seen remarkable changes in how people view online shopping as a whole. Last year, physical stores were full of people swarming to grab the lowest Black Friday deals, but this 2016, we’ve seen tides change as people now turn to online shopping because of its hassle-free benefits.

Even though sales were expected to go up, but that’s no longer the case. “In 2016, consumers can find most of those deals online over the course of a couple days, and they don’t have to brave massive crowds to do it,” Fortune concludes.

Online shopping has indeed reshaped people’s buying habits. Before, Black Friday sales were anticipated as its date comes near. However, this 2016, Amazon dared to change the status quo as they started their Black Friday deals as early as November 1.

TechCrunch has crunched the numbers for us, with a report on Adobe’s final numbers on Black Friday. They figured out that this year’s sales surpassed estimates, with $3.34 billion – 21.6 percent growth, year-over-year.

Thanksgiving and Black Friday mobiles sales were over the top, with top online retailers like Amazon, Target, and Walmart releasing numbers that mobile has opened a new era of online shopping, with its tumultuous contribution on their online sales via exclusive mobile app deals.

2016 is indeed the year of mobile ecommerce taking over ecommerce websites.

They added that, “in 2020, mobile apps are projected to generate 188.9 billion U.S. dollars in revenues via app stores and in-app advertising.”

 

Moving app: from web to app

Binny Bansal’s gamble on going app-only earned mixed reactions. It did not take too long before Amazon India caught up with their growth.

Flipkart has dared to go where other sites won’t try; an app-only ecommerce store in India. Despite the revenue and its ruling power in India, this only gave Amazon India the asset it needed to get ahead of the competition. Perhaps it was too soon to leave the desktop-only audience, however, Flipkart paved the way that it is possible to run a store that would reach any user from any part of the country (or the world) via a mobile app.

First Index and the Death of Desktop

Google just started rolling out the so-called “mobile-first” index. It’s going to change the way that your site gets ranked in the search engine results pages (SERPs). Here are a things you need to know about the mobile-first index so that you can optimize your website accordingly.

 

What is the mobile-first index?

By now, you probably know that Google crawls your site to add pages to its index. That is, it uses a bot to surf around your site like a real visitor and follows links on your pages.

In the past, Google crawled your site as a desktop user. Now, however, Google will crawl your site as a mobile user. That’s a distinction with a really big difference.

For starters, your website might present a completely different display to mobile users versus desktop users. In some cases, links that appear on the desktop version of your site might not appear on the mobile version. That’s bad because the Googlebot can’t follow links that aren’t there. As a result, your site might take a hit in the SERPs.

Keep in mind also that Google uses a number of ranking signals to determine where your site should land in the results list. If the bot finds that your site is hostile to mobile users or loads very slowly, you’re definitely going to lose rank.

The bottom line — when performing search engine optimization (SEO) for your site, start with optimizing it for a mobile audience. That’s the prime directive now.

 

Why is Google using a mobile-first index?

If you’re wondering why Google is switching to a mobile-first index, the answer is simple. Mobile is everything. That’s the short answer, anyway. The long answer is a little more involved.

For starters, the number of mobile users surpassed the number of desktop users a couple of years ago. If anything, Google is late to the game. In addition to that, Google says that there are more mobile searches than desktop searches. So it makes perfect sense that its bot should crawl pages as a mobile user.

 

What if you don’t have a mobile site?

If you don’t have a responsive website, you might be asking yourself: “What’s going to happen to my site?” You can rest easy. The Googlebot will crawl the desktop version of your site just fine, even though it’s using a mobile user agent. That means your site can still be indexed.

Free advice, though — you should definitely switch over to a responsive template. In this day and age, anyone who’s serious about making a statement online needs a website that adapts to a mobile platform.

Tech and Data are Transforming Small Businesses

As technology and data continually impact how small business owners conduct and operate their businesses, there will be new opportunities to transform business functions and leverage these capabilities for business growth. See how businesses are already changing and how technology can serve as an enabler to uncovering new ways to be successful.

Google just started rolling out the so-called “mobile-first” index. It’s going to change the way that your site gets ranked in the search engine results pages (SERPs). Here are a things you need to know about the mobile-first index so that you can optimize your website accordingly.

 

What is the mobile-first index?

By now, you probably know that Google crawls your site to add pages to its index. That is, it uses a bot to surf around your site like a real visitor and follows links on your pages.

In the past, Google crawled your site as a desktop user. Now, however, Google will crawl your site as a mobile user. That’s a distinction with a really big difference.

For starters, your website might present a completely different display to mobile users versus desktop users. In some cases, links that appear on the desktop version of your site might not appear on the mobile version. That’s bad because the Googlebot can’t follow links that aren’t there. As a result, your site might take a hit in the SERPs.

Keep in mind also that Google uses a number of ranking signals to determine where your site should land in the results list. If the bot finds that your site is hostile to mobile users or loads very slowly, you’re definitely going to lose rank.

The bottom line — when performing search engine optimization (SEO) for your site, start with optimizing it for a mobile audience. That’s the prime directive now.

Why is Google using a mobile-first index?

If you’re wondering why Google is switching to a mobile-first index, the answer is simple. Mobile is everything. That’s the short answer, anyway. The long answer is a little more involved.

For starters, the number of mobile users surpassed the number of desktop users a couple of years ago. If anything, Google is late to the game. In addition to that, Google says that there are more mobile searches than desktop searches. So it makes perfect sense that its bot should crawl pages as a mobile user.